Search again

5 Results for: "PEACH Project"

Longitudinal changes in sedentary time and physical activity during adolescence

  • Published on April 1, 2015

Background: Low levels of physical activity and high time spent in sedentary activities have been associated with unfavourable health outcomes in adolescents. During adolescence, physical activity declines and sedentary time increases, however little is known about whether the magnitude of these changes differs within or between school-time, after-school time, or ...


Active Travel and Physical Activity Across the School Transition: The PEACH Project

  • Added on December 3, 2012

Purpose Physical activity in youth decreases with age, with the transition from primary to secondary school being a key period for change. Active travel to school has been associated with higher physical activity in youth compared with those who travel by car. This study investigated whether change in travel mode ...


Combining Accelerometers with GPS to Investigate Children's Outdoor Physical Activity

  • Added on June 16, 2011

Introduction With increasing interest in how the physical environment may influence physical activity, methods are needed that can be used to investigate the environmental context of activity. The aim of this study is to use combined accelerometer and GPS data to describe the level and location of children’s physical ...


Correlates of Seasonal Outdoor Physical Activity Measured Using Accelerometers and GPS

  • Published on 2011

Introduction Combining GPS and accelerometer data offers a new opportunity to objectively measure children’s time spent active outdoors [1]. This is important as greater time spent outdoors is related to reduced risk of obesity. We know little about what factors determine children’s outdoor activity. This study uniquely investigated the ...


Independent Mobility in Relation to Weekday and Weekend Physical Activity in Children Aged 10-11 Years: The PEACH Project

  • Published on 2009

Children's independent mobility has fallen in recent years and may in part explain reported declines in physical activity in young people. This cross-sectional study investigated whether independent mobility in boys and girls was related to objectively measured physical activity. Methods Thirteen hundred and seven 10-11 year old boys and girls ...