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5 Results for: "ALSPAC"

Concurrent and prospective associations among biological maturation, and physical activity at 11 and 13 years of age

  • Published on Sept. 17, 2013

This study examined concurrent and prospective associations between objective measures of biological maturation, body composition and physical activity (PA) in adolescent males (nā€‰=ā€‰671) and females (nā€‰=ā€‰680). Participants born to women recruited to the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children birth cohort study were assessed at 11 and 13 years. ...


Associations between objectively measured physical activity and academic attainment in adolescents from a UK cohort

  • Published on Oct. 22, 2013

Background To test for cross-sectional (at age 11) and longitudinal associations between objectively measured free-living physical activity (PA) and academic attainment in adolescents.Method Data from 4755 participants (45% male) with valid measurement of PA (total volume and intensity) by accelerometry at age 11 from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) ...


Modelling Fat Mass as a Function of Weekly Physical Activity Profiles Measured by Actigraph Accelerometers

  • Published on November 2012

We show results on the Avon longitudinal study of parents and children (ALSPAC) using a new approach for modelling the relationship between health outcomes and physical activity assessed by accelerometers. The key feature of the model is that it uses the histogram of physical activity counts as a predictor function, ...


Modelling Obesity as a Function of Weekly Physical Activity Profiles Measured by ActiGraph Accelerometers

  • Added on June 16, 2011

Introduction Epidemiological studies for investigating physical activity as a predictor for a health outcome such as obesity often use average daily moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) as a summary of the highly dimensional actigraph measurements. The problem with using a single summary statistics such as MVPA is that it ...


Why a Short Run is Better Than a Long Walk

  • Published on 12/2009

Using the latest technology, researchers are uncovering evidence of exactly how major a role activity plays in the battle to keep obesity at bay. In new report published in the British Medical Journal, scientists have shown that it's the type of exercise you do, rather than the amount, that's most ...